Languages: Chinese: Courses

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Courses By Semester

The following tables represent the the semester when a course is typically offered (if it is planned to be offered in a particular semester; there are also other courses occasionally offered). There is some flexibility to adjust courses based on demand and instructor availability.  Contact the Chinese Advisor and/or search the Schedule of Classes in OSCAR for upcoming semester's offerings.

Jump to descriptions of the following courses: 1501 & 25013003, 3004, 3021, 4003, 4004, 4006, 4021, 4022, 4023, 4500, 4699

Online Courses: Chinese 1000-2000 levels and 1501 & 2501 also offered as online courses.

Fall Semester

  • CHIN 1001 - Elementary Chinese I
  • CHIN 1002 - Elementary Chinese II
  • CHIN 1501 - Heritage Chinese I
  • CHIN 2001 - Intermediate Chinese I
  • CHIN 2002 - Intermediate Chinese II
  • CHIN 2501 - Heritage Chinese II
  • CHIN 3003 - Intermediate Chinese III
  • CHIN 3021 - Chin Society & Culture I
  • CHIN 4003 - Advanced Chinese II
  • CHIN 4021 - Adv. Lang., Pop Music & Culture
  • CHIN 4813 - Special Topics

Spring Semester

  • CHIN 1001 - Elementary Chinese I
  • CHIN 1002 - Elementary Chinese II
  • CHIN 1501 - Heritage Chinese I
  • CHIN 2001 - Intermediate Chinese I
  • CHIN 2002 - Intermediate Chinese II
  • CHIN 2501 - Heritage Cinese II
  • CHIN 3004 - Advanced Chinese I
  • CHIN 3022 - Chin Society & Culture II
  • CHIN 4004 - Advanced Chinese III
  • CHIN 4022 - Kungfu Fiction & Pop Culture
  • CHIN 4023 - Strategy & The Art of War

Sequence for Beginning Students

The basic Chinese language sequence from 1st year to 4th year is as follows: 1001, 1002, 2001, 2002, 3003, 3004, 4003, 4004. Further details can be found in the online course catalogue.

Integrated Chinese Textbook - Class Correlation

The following list indicates the curriculum for Chinese 1001 thru Chinese 2002. Please note that there is overlap between the Heritage courses (1501, 2501) and the regular courses (1001, 1002, 2001, 2002). Thus, if you start with the regular course, but elect to return to the heritage series, please contact the Chinese Advisor for additional clarification, if necessary.

Class Textbook Series: Integrated Chinese 4th Edition Lessons
CHIN 1001 Integrated Chinese Level 1, Part 1 Intro-7
CHIN 1002 Integrated Chinese Level 1, Part 1 & Part 2 8-15
CHIN 2001 Integrated Chinese Level 1, Part 2 16-20
CHIN 2001 Integrated Chinese Level 2, Part 1 1-2
CHIN 2002 Integrated Chinese Level 2, Part 1 3-10

Course Descriptions

Chinese 1501 & 2501: Heritage Chinese I, II

Description: Heritage learners. This is a 3 credits course, which is designed for students from heritage background but cannot read or write it well. Students will develop the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese, with the latter two as the focus. Topics of 1501 are about the home life and social life in America of Chinese-American young people, including the identity issues, one’s (parents’) hometown, taking Chinese in college, the cultural heritage, and watching films.

CHIN 2501 is the second course in the Chinese sequence geared for heritage learners. Students will keep developing the four skills of listening, advanced speaking, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese and building up advanced language format, and correction of grammatical irregularities. Topics enhance understanding of Chinese culture and Chinese American culture, as well as modern Chinese life and political situation of the greater China region. Students who have taken CHIN 2001, 2002 (or the equivalent) are welcome to register. Contact the Chinese Advisor or Instructor with questions.

Textbook: Chih-p'ing Chou, Perry Link, and Xuedong Wang. Oh, China! An Elementary Reader of Modern Chinese for Advanced Beginners - Revised Edition. Princeton University Press, 2011. Lesson 1-20

Chinese 3003: Intermediate Chinese III

Description: This is a 3 credit, proficiency based, upper intermediate level language course which simultaneously develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Mandarin Chinese. CHIN 3003 is the 5th semester in the basic Chinese language sequence and a continuation from Chinese 2002 (Chinese 2002 or equivalent are required – see/email instructor for placement). Students are expected to continue expanding their knowledge of vocabulary (approximately 600-700 vocabulary written in characters, traditional and/or simplified), grammar and sentence structures. You are encouraged to become passively familiar with traditional or simplified characters (depending upon which set you have not studied). Not open to native speakers/readers. Pre-req: CHIN 2002 or equivalent

Textbook: Bai Jianhua, Juyu Sung & Janet Zhiqun Xing. Beyond the Basics: Communicative Chinese for Intermediate/Advanced Learners. 2nd ed. Boston: Cheng & Tsui Co., 2009. Lessons 1-7.

Chinese 3004: Advanced Chinese I

Description: This is a 3 credit, proficiency based, advanced level third year language course which simultaneously develops listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Mandarin Chinese. This is the 6th semester in the basic Chinese language sequence and a direct continuation of Chinese 3003. Students are expected to continue expanding their knowledge of vocabulary (approximately 600-700 vocabulary written in characters, traditional and/or simplified), grammar and sentence structures. You are encouraged to become passively familiar with traditional or simplified characters (depending upon which set you have not studied). Not open to native speakers/readers. Pre-req: CHIN 3003 or equivalent.

Textbook: Bai Jianhua, Juyu Sung & Janet Zhiqun Xing. Beyond the Basics: Communicative Chinese for Intermediate/Advanced Learners. 2nd ed. Boston: Cheng & Tsui Co., 2009. Lessons 8-14.

Chinese 3021: Chinese Society & Culture I

Description: This intermediate-advanced course is designed for students who have taken two or three years of Chinese language courses and intend to broaden their vocabulary and grammar foundation, as well as understanding of cultural issues in contemporary China. The 8 topics for this semester include public signs, standard speech and writing, “Made in China” products, henpecked husbands, Chinese idioms, “Iron Bowl” secure jobs, ping-pong diplomacy, and the college entrance examination. Pre-req: CHIN 2002 or equivalent.

Textbook: Chih-p’ing Chou, et. al. A New China: An Intermediate Reader of Modern Chinese. Princeton University Press, 2011.

CHIN 3401: A Kaleidoscope of Chinese Language

This course explores the Chinese language from multiple perspectives, examining its multifaceted and intriguing interactions with society, culture, gender, music, politics, and media. The five topics covered in this course include: Linguistic Diversity (What’s the difference between a “language” and a “dialect,” When and how was Mandarin selected as the national language?); Chinese Writing and Contemporary Art (Are Chinese characters “pictographs” or “ideographs”? What are other myths about the Chinese writing? How the contemporary artists are reinventing Chinese characters in their artwork?); Language and Gender (How Nǚshū was developed among peasant women in Hunan province and how language signifies masculinity?); Language and Music (How can the lyrics of a song in a tonal language be understood; how to explain the unintelligibility in Higher Brothers’ “mumble rap”?); Language and Globalization (Is Chinese highly resistant to outside linguistic influence? What’s the significance of the Internet language and the coded language? Should Chinglish be “sentenced to death”?).

Taught in English, but completion of at least one year of the Chinese language is recommended.

Chinese 3400/ML2500 Chinese Cultural Odyssey: Chinese Civilization from Yao to Mao and Beyond

Description: This course, taught in English, introduces students to various aspects of Chinese culture from antiquity to the 20th century through a general survey of social, political, economic, intellectual, and cultural areas of Chinese history. This course also introduces the patterns of the Chinese past in evolution and revolution and addresses how the patterns of the past have influenced the present. Traditional China will be discussed in a global context with comparisons and contrasts, where appropriate, with other traditional cultures and with nations in other parts of the world. Historical analysis will be used to set philosophical, religious, literary and other texts in the context of their times. Particular attention will be given to how various elements tied “China” as a cultural entity together so well as to set up some important foundations for modern China. The primary learning objective is to improve your understanding of Chinese culture by increasing your awareness of the diversity and dynamics of Chinese society, the continuity that links China’s past and present, and the historical contingency inherent in the formation of China’s empire. The​ learning outcome will be achieved through assigned readings, class discussion, writing assignments, quizzes, oral presentations, movie/documentary viewing, group projects, and other class activities.

Chinese 4003: Advanced Chinese I

Description: This advanced level course is designed for the students who have taken three years of Chinese language courses and may have done the LBAT study-abroad program as well. Reading materials are selected from the Chinese newspapers and magazines since 2000. They deal with topics related to the economic, cultural, social, and political changes in China since the country’s opening up in the late 1970s. The topics we discuss this semester include the pros and cons of cell phone and high tech; the “dangers” of the Internet and the Internet censorship, marriage issues, gender imbalance, language policy, and the cheap labor/American President's election. Topics may vary each year. Pre-req: CHIN 3004 or equivalent.

Chinese 4004: Advanced Chinese II

Description: This advanced level course is designed for the students who have taken three years of Chinese language courses and may have done the LBAT study-abroad program. It is a continuation of CHIN 4003, although 4003 is not a prerequisite. Reading materials are selected from authentic Chinese newspapers and magazines. They deal with topics related to the economic, cultural, social, and political changes in China since the country’s opening up in the late 1970s. The topics we will cover this semester include American families’ adoption of Chinese orphans, urbanization and migrant workers, housing reforms, environment protection, college graduates in the tough job market, globalization and western influence, and Taiwan and Hong Kong issues. Pre-req: CHIN 3004 or equivalent.

Chinese 4006: Intercultural Communication

Description: This course examines how and why Chinese and Americans often misunderstand or misinterpret each other in their verbal and nonverbal communication and interactions. We seek to identify the distinctive patterns of thought and action that account for the particular configurations of Chinese and American cultures. The goal is to foster students’ understanding of the importance of cultural factors of one’s own as well as others in shaping people’s lives, businesses, society, policies and politics.

Following a comparative analysis of sharply contrasting historical and cultural configuration of the two countries, we will take a bird’s eye look at the Sino-American tableau from 1784, when the first American ship dropped anchor off Guangzhou, to the Second World War, which set the stage for a closer – and more complicated – relationship. The main focus of the course will be on the period since the Nixon-Zhou Enlai communiqué of 1972 that broke the Cold War impasse and ushered in the era of intense engagement that continues to the present. Pre-req: CHIN 3004 or equivalent.

Chinese 4021: Advanced Language, Popular Music and Culture

Description: Utilizing popular songs/videos as cultural texts, this 3 credit, proficiency based, advanced level language and culture course simultaneously continues the’ development of conversation/oral presentation, listening, reading, writing and web-based research in Chinese. Taught in Chinese. Heritage learners welcome. Not open to native speakers/readers.Not open to native speakers/readers. Pre-req: CHIN 3004 or equivalent (contact instructor).

Attributes: Typically covers Advanced Language Acquisition, Societies and Cultures, Arts and Media

Online Text/Courseware: Paul. B. Foster 傅抱仁, 《高级汉语、流行音乐与文化》 [Advanced Language, Popular Music and Culture], Interface: Szu-Chia Lu, Georgia Tech School of Modern Languages, 2013.

Chinese 4022: Kungfu Fiction & Pop Culture

Description: Utilizing authentic Chinese kungfu fiction texts, this 3 credit, proficiency based, advanced level language and culture course simultaneously continues the students’ development skills of conversation/oral presentation, listening, reading, writing and web-based research in Chinese. Access page here. Taught in Chinese. Heritage learners welcome. Not open to native speakers/readers.Not open to native speakers/readers. Pre-req: CHIN 3004 or equivalent (contact instructor).

Attributes: Typically covers Advanced Language Acquisition, Societies and Cultures, Arts and Media

Online Text/Courseware: Paul. B. Foster 傅抱仁, Jin Yong’s Martial Arts Fiction: A Textbook for Advanced Chinese Language and Pop Culture Study 《金庸武侠小说:高级汉语与流行文化》.

Chinese 4023: Strategy & The Art of War

Description: Utilizing authentic classical texts with their modern Chinese translations, examples of the modern application of Sunzi’s Art of War 《孙子兵法》 and The Thirty-Six Stratagems 《三 十六计》 found in martial arts literature, as well as television series adaptations and television reports, this 3 credit, proficiency based, advanced level language and culture course simultaneously continues the students’ development skills of conversation/oral presentation, listening, reading (including an introduction to Classical Chinese), writing and web-based research in Chinese. Taught in Chinese. Heritage learners welcome. Not open to native speakers/readers. Pre-req: CHIN 3004 or equivalent (contact instructor).

Attributes: Typically covers Advanced Language Acquisition, Societies and Cultures, Arts and Media, Industry and Technology

Online Text/Curriculum: Paul. B. Foster 傅抱仁, 高级汉语: 《孙子兵法》与《三十六计》 [Advanced Chinese: Sunzi's Art of War & The Thirty-Six Stratagems]. Georgia Tech School of Modern Languages, 2015.

Chinese 4032: Kungfu & Wuxia Film

Description: Utilizing authentic kungfu and wuxia films and online writing about them as texts, this 3 credit, proficiency based, advanced level language and culture course simultaneously continues the students’ development of the skills of conversation/oral presentation, listening, reading, writing and web-based research in Chinese. Topics include the historical, social, and culture background of martial arts movies and kungfu film, analysis of specific films and actors (eg., Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, Shaolin kungfu, late 20th century adaptations, transnational film, etc.). Taught in Chinese. Heritage learners welcome. Not open to native speakers/readers. Pre-req: CHIN 3004 or equivalent (contact instructor).

Online Text/Courseware: Paul. B. Foster 傅抱仁, Fall 2019.

Chinese 4823/8803: Traditional Chinese Society and Culture Thru Vernacular Short Stories

Description: This course, taught in Chinese, aims to further developing their Chinese proficiency, particularly in reading and writing, of students who have reached the advanced level and to expanding their knowledge in traditional Chinese society and culture. A series of aspects in traditional Chinese social life that still bears close relevancy in modern China will be covered, such as romantic love, family life, social custom, religious/popular beliefs, legal cases, and so on. Readings and discussions are based on vernacular short stories, poems, visual images and artifacts, as well as modern movie adaptations. Through writing synopsis, making presentations, and collaborating on group performance skits, students not only improve their language skill, but also cross-cultural competence, critical thinking, and collaborative skills.

Chinese 4500: Intercultural Seminar

Description: This is the Capstone Course for Chinese ALIS Majors. Conducted in Mandarin Chinese, the capstone course is designed to equip students with strong intercultural communication and critical thinking skills in business, economics, politics, international relations, education, media, etc., in an increasingly globalized world. The course begins with an introduction to key concepts in Chinese culture, philosophy, and thoughts. In particular, students will read and discuss the passages from Analects and Daodejing. It then moves on to discuss Sino-U.S. intercultural communication in modern history, focusing on the shared history of the Chinese and American people in education and culture. Next, it examines case studies in contemporary popular culture, academic exchange, and business industry, in particular in terms of cross-cultural conflict, misunderstanding, and appropriation. Finally, students apply the theoretical and cultural concepts they have learned from this course and conduct research with enhanced intercultural sensibility, a comparative perspective, and an open mind.

The overall goal is to raise students’ cultural, intercultural, and linguistic competence in an integrated way. Specifically, upon successful completion of the required coursework, students are expected to achieve a higher (1) cultural competence by learning key concepts and notions in traditional Chinese thoughts and philosophy, the DNA of the Chinese culture, (2) intercultural competence through subject learning, and (3) linguistic competence in a naturally paced interactive environment. Pre-req: CHIN 4004 or equivalent.

Chinese 4699: Undergraduate Research

Description: Undergraduate research is independent study. A few rules of thumb to consider:

  • Pre-reqs: It's best to have completed 3rd year Chinese to be able to successfully tackle a research course.
  • Faculty/Student Record: Research projects are challenging, and require extraordinary individual discipline, thus it is typical to have a track record with the professor with whom you are doing the undergraduate research, which also indicates the level of confidence in your successfully completing the project.
  • Research Protocol: You'll need to complete a research protocol with your professor (varies by professor) before you'll be allowed to register in order make sure the project is well defined and your assessment and the progression of your research is clear. This will help ensure success in your project/course.
  • Contact Professor: Students should contact the instructor to discuss protocol and explore the possibility of pursuing a 4699.

Chinese 4813: Chinese Science Fiction

Description: This 3 credit, proficiency based, advanced level language and culture course simultaneously continues the students’ development skills of conversation/oral presentation, listening, reading, writing and web-based research in Chinese utilizing authentic Chinese text excerpts drawn from Liu Cixin’s 刘慈欣 Three Body Problem 《三体》, and various related media. We will examine cultural/social/political/historical issues related allegorically through our readings. Curiosity and critical thinking required. Taught in Chinese. Heritage learners welcome. Not open to native speakers/readers. Pre-req: CHIN 3004 or equivalent (contact instructor).

Online Text/Courseware: Paul. B. Foster 傅抱仁, Fall 2020.

Chinese 4813: Lu Xun & Modern Chinese Literature

Description: This is a 3 credit, fourth year advanced level language, culture and communication course which utilizes the short stories of modern China’s greatest author, Lu Xun, and online writing about them as texts, to study language and culture. Works include:

  • “Diary of a Madman” 狂人日记
  • “Kong Yiji” 孔乙己
  • “Medicine” 药
  • “Storm in a Teacup” 风波
  • “Hometown” 故乡
  • “New Year’s Sacrifice” 祝福
  • The True Story of Ah Q 阿 Q 正传

We simultaneously continue the development of the skills of conversation/oral presentation, listening, reading, writing and web-based research in Chinese. Topics focus on Lu Xun’s stories and include the historical, social, and culture background of modern Chinese literature in the 1910s, 1920s, and 1930s. Taught in Chinese. Heritage learners welcome. Not open to native speakers/readers. Pre-req: CHIN 3004 or equivalent (contact instructor).

Online Text/Courseware: Paul. B. Foster 傅抱仁, updated Spring 2021.