Jasmine Sampson

Profile Type
Student
Degree
B.S. ALIS-Korean

Name: Jasmine Sampson

Majors: Industrial Design and Applied Languages and Intercultural Studies (ALIS) — Korean

Minor: Linguistics

Anticipated Graduation Date: 2025

Hometown: Douglasville

Favorite class: My elementary Korean courses

Favorite professor: Jong Hyun Lee and Lee Hyunjeong Oh

Internships/clubs: CaribSA, Phi Sigma Pi, Samulnori Club

Most helpful resource in the School of Modern Languages: My professors. They are so passionate about what they do and make themselves easily approachable.

  1. Why did you choose to study Korean at Georgia Tech?

I’ve always had an interest in Korean culture. I started learning Korean to pass the time in quarantine. It was challenging learning a completely new language, especially one so different from English. I would watch videos and shows about different aspects and values of South Korean culture and grow even more fascinated with it. When it came time to research topics for my internal assessment paper for IB history, I knew I wanted to focus on some aspect of Korean history. Learning the different time periods and researching how South Korea came to be what it is today was so interesting that I didn’t mind the extensive research. The one thing that has stayed consistent through these unprecedented times was my fascination with learning Korean culture, so I knew that I had to continue my pursuit of learning Korean in college.

  1. What inspired you to be a double major? How do you feel language skills complement your other area of study?

The original plan was to pursue Korean as a minor. However, I just had to take advantage of the flexibility of the B.S. in ALIS!

  1. What’s the coolest research/project/initiative/event you’ve worked on in Modern Languages?

I haven’t been involved with much research since I am a first-year. But I’m excited to do so in the future!

  1. How does a degree from Modern Languages contribute to your life plans?

Learning a new language, in general, broadens the audience with which one can communicate. In the future, I hope to be able to study and work abroad in South Korea and effectively engage with cultures with values and customs different from my own.

  1. What has been your biggest challenge at Georgia Tech, and how did you overcome it?

My biggest challenge coming into Georgia Tech has probably been my feelings of inadequacy when comparing myself to my peers. When I saw all the things people had accomplished, I felt like I was behind. This was especially true at the beginning of the fall semester. Before, I was the one who had their life figured out and knew exactly what I wanted to do, or so I thought.

I originally came in as computer science major. At first, I was genuinely interested in it as it was something I enjoyed doing in high school. However, as I got further into my CS courses, I found myself hating the work and lacking motivation for the subject matter. I couldn’t imagine myself doing this work for the rest of my life. It took talking to those I trust around me who have been through the same things to realize that what I was feeling was normal. I reflected and searched for a program that will utilize and expand on the skills I have that I actually enjoy doing and found my place in Industrial Design and ALIS.

  1. What is the biggest change you see in yourself now from when you started at Georgia Tech?

I’m a lot more open-minded to change, even when it is out of my comfort zone.

  1. What’s your favorite spot on campus, and why?

Definitely the top floors of the library. I love getting a pastry and drink from one of the cafes and studying. The ambiance of students working motivates me to work and, if I’m lucky enough, I try and get a seat near the windows that overlook the scenic view.

  1. What advice would you give to incoming students in the School of Modern Languages?

Don’t be afraid to talk to the advisors. They are there to listen and help you with anything you need.